DISCOVER HOW YOUR FAVORITE NOONDAY PIECES ARE CREATED.

Artillery

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Ethiopia Artillery

The countryside of Ethiopia is littered with memories of former war conflicts. Farmers gather bullet casings scattered across their fields.

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The artillery is added to a mixture of metals and melted down, then re-made into beautiful beads that are strung onto lengths of string for the women to use.

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The women sort the beads, check to make sure they are of the highest quality, and divide them by style and shape.

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They gather together in local workshops around Addis, Ababa to string the beads, creating a vast array of upcycled designs.

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Artisans quality check each piece, then burn the ends to secure their work in place. They take great pride in every necklace, bracelet, and earring they make.

Beadwork

In Guatemala, our resourceful artisan partners create their own bead looms using nails and a plank of wood. Men and women work together to create these hand-beaded cuffs. The women gather together to string delicate beads in intricate patterns.

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Embroidery

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Our Peruvian Artisan partners keep the traditional motifs of their country alive, while incorporating modern design.

They use the softest wool yarns, spooling the wool using a traditional wooden cone winder so it is ready to adorn a special piece.

Embroidery is a community affair. The women often gather to hand-stitch traditional and modern motifs onto wool fabric, with their children playing nearby.

When each piece is complete, it is carefully checked for any flaws and measured to ensure a perfect fit.

Hand Knit Alpaca

Many of our alpaca pieces are hand-knit by small co-operatives throughout Peru. The soft strands of alpaca fiber are spun into yarn, dyed, and knit into unique cold weather accessories. Alpaca is the second most common animal fiber used in warm clothing around the world.

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Manual Machine Knit Alpaca

Some of our most complex and beautiful designs are made on manual knitting machines. These machines are run by hand and do not require electricity, which allows the artisans to create intricate patterns without having to rely on a source of power—an expensive and often unreliable resource.

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Metal

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In India, men and women rarely work together, but at one of our Indian partner groups, they come together to combine their skills and abilities.

The artisans create the hardware for each piece from scratch, attaching metal rods to each delicate bead.

They then shape and bend each rod into a loop to create their own jump rings.

Finally, each delicate bead is attached to the chain and the jump rings are closed.

While waiting for dozens of the dangling beads to be attached, it can be hard to be patient!

But finally, the necklace is complete and ready to make the journey to the United States.

Fermin and his fellow artisans create beautiful, high-quality jewelry in the same way Fermin's father and grandfather did, completely from scratch.

They hand-cut sheets of metal to create unique and intricate shapes for their pieces.

Semi-precious stones are hand cut and polished to perfection for use in some of the workshop's most striking pieces.

The artisans press natural fibers found in local vegetables into the metal while it is still warm to create the distinctive patterns found in pieces like our Rain Drop Earrings.

These artisans are committed to creating each component from scratch, including the earring backs for their studs, which they hand roll from small pieces of silver.

Metalworking

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Paper Beads

Our artisan partners in Uganda are skilled at creating intricate jewelry using upcycled, brightly colored paper. They carefully cut the paper into tiny strips, then roll each strip around a toothpick to create a bead. The artisans can roll the paper in many different ways to create unique shapes and styles.

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Foot Pedal Sewing

Each of our Rwandan textiles is sewn on a manual foot pedal sewing machine by one of the 11 seamstresses we work with. With each new design the women receive, they travel to the Kigali market to find the brightest and most beautiful among the many thousands of fabrics sold there.

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Horn Jewelry

Our horn pieces begin as gigantic, ethically gathered water buffalo horns, which residents of this Vietnamese village have used for centuries to make unique arts and crafts. The artisans cut each piece in half and then stick patterns to the back side of the horn to indicate how it needs to be cut.

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Weaving & Dyeing

Weaving has played an integral role in the lives of over 25 Mayan people groups in Guatemala for centuries. The highly intricate designs communicate the personal identity, heritage, and ideological beliefs of the group that created them.

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Our tagua pieces start out as a large pod. It may not look like much, but our Ecuadorian artisan partners are skilled at transforming these unsightly pods into works of art.

The artisans separate the seed from the pod and cut the seed with a saw to the perfect shape and size.

The cut pieces are placed in a tumbler where they are buffed and smoothed to perfection.

The tagua is cleaned and dyed rich colors in large tubs and then left to dry.

The artisans drill small holes in each piece, string the beads, and burn off all loose ends to create each special necklace and bracelet.

Tagua Seed

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